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ATHLETES

Q. When did the new rules come into effect?
A. The revised Rules came into effect on 5 April, 2010.

Q. As an athlete, how do the new anti-doping regulations affect me?
You are expected to compete in full compliance with the new anti-doping rules. You are also expected to have reviewed the Equine Prohibited Substances List and to have checked all your horses’ current medications against the list. Unlike in the past, the new prohibited substances list catalogues all substances and medications that are not allowed to be used in FEI competitions. You are also required to keep an official Medication Logbook recording all substances within the Equine Prohibited Substances List that have been administered to your horse.

Q. Where can I get the Medication Logbook from?
A. A template has been supplied to your National Federation for distribution. The FEI is also looking at other methods of providing a record of medications given to horses.

Q. What are my responsibilities as an athlete?
A. You are responsible for knowing the new anti-doping rules and being familiar with the prohibited substances list. You should also ensure that members of your team: vets, managers, coaches, and grooms are familiar with the rules and the list.

Q. Where can I learn about the rule changes that came into effect on 5 April 2010 and new substances added to the List?
A. The new rules can be viewed here and the new Equine Prohibited Substances list can be viewed here. You can also check out the Athlete's Guide here.

Q. As an athlete, how can I avoid testing positive for a Prohibited Substance if I am taking medication prescribed by my doctor?
A. First, make sure that you are always updated on the latest version of the Prohibited List, which is reviewed annually by the World Anti-Doping Agency, as your medication may not necessarily be prohibited.  (The list is available on the WADA website www.wada-ama.org)  Second, if your medication is prohibited, you may apply to the FEI for a Therapeutic Use Exemption (TUE) with support from your doctor.  You can find the information on applying for a TUE on the FEI website here. Third, if you are purchasing over-the-counter medication, consult your national anti-doping agency or show the WADA Prohibited List currently in force to the pharmacist to be sure that the medication does not contain anything prohibited.  Fourth and finally, if your doctor writes you a prescription, remind the doctor that you are an Athlete subject to anti-doping regulations.  If the doctor has any doubt about whether the prescription would violate the rules, ensure that the doctor consults with your national anti-doping agency for clarification.

Q. Who can be tested in Equestrian sport, and how?
A: Any Athlete can be subject to Testing. Testing can take place In Competition (at Event venues, during the period of an Event) or Out of Competition (at home, at training venues, etc). Athlete selection can be random, based on established criteria (ie: final placement), or targeted. Following notification in person by a Doping Control Officer, the Athlete will be chaperoned at all times until completion of the sampling process. The Athlete will need to provide a urine sample, which will be received anonymously by the analysing laboratory.  If the Athlete needs some time to be ready to produce the sample, he/she will remain chaperoned during this time, and safe drinking water will always be provided.

Q. What is the Human athlete WADA based TUE programme? Who does it affect?
 A. All FEI registered Riders who need to take medication which is on WADA’s Prohibited List must submit a Therapeutic Use Exemption (TUE) application to the FEI to allow them to take the medication they need while continuing to compete. The TUE application is submitted to the FEI Medical Committee Members who consider the application and decide whether or not to approve it.  If it is approved, it is sent to the National Federation which forwards it to the Athlete and maintains a copy on file. Riders who are listed on the FEI Registered Testing Pool (RTP) list are compelled to submit their TUEs through WADA’s Anti-Doping Administration & Management System (ADAMS). Those TUEs are automatically submitted to the FEI Medical Committee Members, and are approved or rejected through ADAMS.

VETERINARIANS | top

Q.  How does the FEI ensure that all veterinarians comply with, and understand, new procedures related to the Rules and Equine Prohibited Substances List?
A. The veterinarian has a responsibility to those they advise in order to ensure that they comply with the rules. They therefore must familiarise themselves with the procedures within the FEI Veterinary Regulations, how to use and search the Equine Prohibited Substances List and the essential requirements of the Equine Anti-Doping and Controlled Medication Regulations (EADCMR). Under the new approach since 5 April 2010 a veterinarian may be clearly identified as a person responsible. The FEI will ensure that only FEI accredited veterinarians can perform professional duties on an FEI site, and can remove such accreditation if required.

Q.  Which substances are allowed during competition?
A. Permitted medications are those that can be used during FEI competition. While they are permitted to be used under FEI rules they are not to be used while the horse is competing (e.g. during the veterinary check rest during the endurance event). Specifically, any permitted medications that are injectable may not be administered whilst under FEI rules without an Equine Therapeutic Use Exemption (ETUE) Form 3 (formerly Med Form 3), which must be completed by a treating veterinarian and countersigned by the FEI Veterinary Delegate present at the event. This administration while under FEI rules may require oversight or stewarding by the FEI Veterinary Delegate or designee. Treating veterinarians are required to consult with the Veterinary Delegate. General and specific examples of permitted medications:

  1. Antibiotics. Note - all except procaine penicillin G.
  2. Antiprotozoals (i.e. specific brand names include Marquis, Navigator).
  3. Antiulcer medications. Specific generic names include Omeprazole, Ranitidine, cimetidine and sucralfate.
  4. Insect repellents.
  5. Anthelmintics. Note: all except Levamisole or Tetramisole.
  6. Rehydration fluid intravenously, minimum 10 litres. (Note: Fluids are not allowed to be administered to horses in the eventing discipline on the morning or afternoon prior to their start on cross-country.)
  7. B-vitamins, amino acids and electrolytes. These have always been allowed orally and in many cases this is still the preferred route of administration. However in some circumstances a veterinarian may prefer to administer them intravenously or intramuscularly. (Note: See above procedure required)
  8. Altrenogest (Regumate) for mares only so long as FEI form 2 is properly submitted.
  9. All topical wound ointments that do not contain a corticosteroid, local anesthetic or irritant (such as capsaicin) or other substances on the Prohibited List.
  10. Preventative or restorative joint therapies. Many of these products in the oral form (chondroitin, glucosamine, etc) have always been allowed orally and in many cases this is the preferred route of administration. However in some circumstances a veterinarian may prefer to administer joint restorative therapy intravenously or intramuscularly. Specific examples of the medications used in this matter are Legend or Hyonate intravenously, Adequan intramuscularly or Pentosan polysulfate intramuscularly.
  11. Note: No intra-articular administration of any medications is allowed whilst under FEI rules.
  12. Q.  What are the origins of the new approach to the FEI Equine Prohibited Substance List?
    A. Experience over time has shown that competitors and their advisers have been confused about exactly what is and what is not prohibited. The FEI Clean Sport Commission (Chaired by Prof Ljungqvist) reported back to the FEI in 2009, and amongst several recommendations, the Commission proposed that a detailed approach be taken to the List. Within the List it was felt that there should be a difference expressed between doping substances and commonly used medications. This new approach to the List is in line with the FEI Code of Conduct for the Welfare of the Horse and WADA principles.

    National Federations | top

    Q.  How should we administer the new regulations?
    A. Your role in the administration of the new regulations is to ensure that your athletes, team managers and other team support staff are fully aware of all elements that directly or indirectly affect them. In particular you need to ensure that athletes know the anti-doping rules and are familiar with the new prohibited substances list. You should also ensure that Organising Committees are aware of their responsibilities under these new regulations, as is already the case with the Statutes, General Regulations and Sports Rules.

    Q.  How does the FEI recommend we communicate with and educate all affiliates about the rule changes that came into effect on 5 April 2010?
    A. The FEI has posted the new rules here and the prohibited substances list here . You should ensure that all affiliates are familiar with this website and its contents and that they are aware of their responsibilities.

    Q.  What are our affiliates responsible for?
    A. Their responsibilities, if they administer international sport for their particular discipline on behalf of the National Federation, are no different to those under the question above: How should we administer these new regulations? In this case both the National Federation and the Affiliate will be jointly responsible for the administration of the new regulations.

    Officials | top

    Q. Has the testing process for horses changed?
    A. The testing process will only change if any improvements in the current well understood system are identified in the future. Our detailed guide to How Testing Works can be viewed here.

    Q. How do we ensure that all organising committees implement the FEI Statutes, General Regulations and Sports Rules?
    A. It is a key part of your responsibility in the lead up to and during an event to ensure that the Organising Committees have implemented the new regulations.

    Q. Is training offered to make sure all officials are working uniformly under the new rules and regulations?
    A. Basic information on Clean Sport has been integrated into all of the FEI education programmes. Specific focus has been given within the new education system for FEI Stewards and the FEI Veterinarians. All FEI Associate Members, including the officials clubs, have been informed about the Clean Sport Website.

    Managers, Coaches & Grooms | top

    Q.  Do the new rule changes directly affect Managers and Coaches?
    A. Yes. There is the possibility of support personnel being liable under the provisions (see the specific question on Support Personnel under Rules below).

    Q.  What can Managers and Coaches do to encourage fair play?
    A. Managers and Coaches can ensure that everyone on the Team, whether athletes or support personnel, know and understand the new regulations, especially how they affect their role in the Team. Managers and Coaches should also ensure that all practices within the Team are in line with the regulations. They must work closely with team veterinarians to ensure compliance with the regulations.

    THE RULES | top

    Q. Why were the anti-doing regulations changed?
    A. In response to the high-profile doping cases from the 2008 Olympic Games, the FEI convened the Commission on Equine Anti-Doping & Medication, chaired by Professor Arne Ljungqvist, Vice-President of the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA). The Commission was invited to continue the work initiated by the FEI Anti-Doping & Medication Task Force and to recommend a practical course of action to establish the best possible system to promote drug-free equine sport.

    These Equine Anti-Doping and Controlled Medication Regulations incorporate the recommendations of the Commission and reflect detailed feedback from all the National Federations. Collectively, we have produced a document that we believe makes a significant contribution to our goal of clean equestrian sport.

    Q. Under the new rules how are support personnel treated in doping cases?
    A. The FEI received a large amount of feedback on the concept of Support Personnel during the consultation process, both supportive and critical. In response to that feedback and re-consideration of the issues, we have significantly narrowed the term and its application. First, there is no strict liability for Support Personnel and Support Personnel has therefore been deleted from Article 2.1 in both the EAD Rules and the ECM Rules. Second, the definition itself has been narrowed and special consideration of the role of the veterinarian as professional has been incorporated. Third, the fact that the Person Responsible will always be liable for an EADCMR violation is reinforced, with the opportunity to add a member of the Support Personnel only when it is warranted by the specific factual circumstances surrounding the allegations against the Person Responsible. Fourth, and finally, the FEI will be implementing an accreditation system that will require all Support Personnel who are accredited for FEI Events to acknowledge and accept the applicability of these Regulations. At bottom, any member of the Support Personnel, whether or not registered with the FEI, can be banned from FEI Events for a violation of these Regulations.

     Q. Were any outside parties allowed to provide suggestions or feedback for the Rule Changes?
    A. The proposed rule changes were sent to all National Federations for comment. The FEI received detailed feedback from 11 National Federations and several other stakeholders. With this feedback, the FEI believes it has collectively produced an effective document towards our goal of clean equestrian sport while simultaneously being sensitive to the welfare of the horse and the reality of competition.

    EQUINE PROHIBITED SUBSTANCES LIST | top

    Q. What has been changed for the Equine Prohibited Substances List for 2011 ?
    A. A summary of the changes to the 2011 Equine FEI Prohibited Substances List can be found here.

    Q. Why has the FEI moved towards the approach and terminology used by the World Anti-Doping Agency (www.wada-ama.org)?
    A. WADA serves as the independent international body responsible for coordinating and monitoring the global fight against doping in sport. It promotes coordinated and effective anti-doping programmes at the international level, but also at the national level through national anti-doping organisations.
    WADA also allows some medications during competition, in recognition that this still allows a level playing field and does not enhance performance unfairly.

    As one of the core principles WADA seeks to achieve is clarity in the presentation and execution of its rules and as clarity is precisely the FEI’s objective, the approaches are immediately aligned. By adopting similar language to that used in many other worldwide sports, the FEI will over time change many of its previously unique terms to those used by WADA i.e. Medication Forms will become Equine Therapeutic Use Exemption (ETUE) forms etc. Moving towards the WADA model was also a clear recommendation of the Clean Sport Commission.

    Q. Why do there appear to be so many individual substances in the adopted FEI Prohibited Substances List?
    A. Over time a large number of substances which could influence the performance of the competition horse have emerged from the pharmaceutical industry. All the substances listed have been viewed as prohibited by the FEI for some time and modern instruments in laboratories can very easily test for thousands of substances at once. Similar lists of substances are also prohibited by other organizations monitoring equine sport, such as racing authorities.

    Q. Within the new FEI Prohibited Substances List, what are the two categories of substances?
    A. Within the List and within the new FEI Equine Anti-Doping and Controlled Medication Regulations (EADCMR) there are two main categories of substances:

    - Banned substances - These are substances that have been deemed by the FEI to have no legitimate use in equine medicine and/or have a high potential for abuse i.e. human antidepressants, antipsychotics, nervous system stimulants, etc.

    - Controlled Medication substances - An exhaustive list of medication that is prohibited in competition, and made up of all known substances which are recognised as therapeutic and/or commonly used, but have the potential to enhance performance at certain levels. Some examples might be anti-inflammatories (see note below about allowed levels), local anesthetics, bronchodilators, cough suppressants and other commonly and uncommonly used medications. Clearly substances on this list may also enhance performance depending on the timing and size of dose.

    No matter what the circumstance, competition horses are expected to compete with no banned substances or controlled medication substances in their systems unless at a level defined and approved by FEI regulations.

    Q. What is the intention behind highlighting banned and controlled medication substances within the List?
    A. The intention is for complete transparency so that athletes and their advisers will know which type of substance is in which category of the list, and what can and cannot be used. Thereby any required enforcement sanctions can be applied appropriately with the knowledge that there is complete clarity as to the agreed FEI view on a substance that has been detected. Clearly the sanctions available for the detection of a banned substance will in most situations be more severe than for a controlled medication substance, but the sanctions for using controlled medication substances could still be up to 2 years.

    Q. Who decided which substances should be included in the List?
    A. The Prohibited Substances List was drafted by the FEI List Group as an outcome of the Clean Sport Commissions. The List will be reviewed at least annually by this group, for approval by the FEI Bureau. This group is composed of a variety of stakeholders - riders, experts in pharmacology, veterinarians and chemists.

    The purpose of the List Group is to ensure that the correct substances are identified and placed in the appropriate List category. For example, some substances could be moved between categories in the light of new evidence, research, or emerging practices. The allowed levels of any substance are also subject to revision over time. Such an approach is in line with the practices of WADA.

    Q. What is the FEI doing to ensure that commonly used controlled medication substances do not lead to accidental positive tests at competitions? What was the "FEI list of Detection Times”?
    A.The FEI has produced a list of medications with detection times - previously known as the "medicine box": These have known time periods after which they will fall below certain detection levels. The cost of undertaking the research to provide this information is high, but the FEI is fully committed to that investment in the future. This list of medications with known detection times can be found here. Having access to more medications with published detection times will also assist stakeholders in making important decisions about the treatment of their horses in preparation for competition.

    Information about the FEI approach to anti-doping and medication control has always been publicly available. However to complement the new approach, the FEI has substantially increased the accessibility to that information, which is available in a variety of easy to use formats. These formats are also suitable for educational and training purposes, of both athletes and the required FEI officials. The Prohibited Substances Database is available here.

    Q. Why are "substances with a similar chemical structure or biological effect" also prohibited in addition to those individually named in the new List?
    A. Every attempt has been made to keep the List comprehensive, however some substances might structurally differ by maybe only a few atoms, from those individually listed, or others might have just as potent an effect as those listed. In order to keep a proposed list sensible, there has to be a fair recognition that such substances are prohibited substances as subsets of the listed substances. This is the WADA approach.

    Q. Does the FEI check for substances that are not itemised in the List?
    A. Yes, the FEI must be vigilant about the emergence of new substances or unusual trends. Then, if appropriate, the FEI List Group can add any substance thought to be suitable for either category of the list, giving 90 days notice before it would be considered prohibited under FEI Regulations. After the addition of the new substance to the list has come into effect, detection could lead to enforcement action.

    Q. Which substances are allowed during competition?
    A. Knowing what is on a Prohibited List gives a good idea of what is allowed during competition. However it is best to check for each discipline. Specifically any medications that are injectable may not be administered whilst under FEI rules without an FEI Form 3, which must be completed by a treating veterinarian and countersigned by the FEI Veterinary Delegate present at the event. This administration while under FEI rules may require oversight or stewarding by the FEI Veterinary Delegate or designee. Treating veterinarians will be required to consult with the Veterinary Delegate.

    General and specific examples of permitted medications:

    1. Antibiotics. Note - all except procaine penicillin G
    2. Antiprotozoals (i.e. specific brand names include Marquis, Navigator)
    3. Antiulcer medications. Specific generic names include Omeprazole, Ranitidine, cimetidine and sucralfate
    4. Insect repellents
    5. Anthelmintics. Note- all except Levamisole or Tetramisole.
    6. Rehydration fluid intravenously, minimum 10 litres. Note - Fluids are not allowed to be administered to horses in the eventing discipline on the morning or afternoon prior to their start on cross-country.
    7. B-vitamins, amino acids and electrolytes. These have always been allowed orally and in many cases this is still the preferred route of administration. However in some circumstances a veterinarian may prefer to administer them intravenously or intramuscularly. Note - See above procedure required
    8. Altrenogest (Regumate) for mares only so long as FEI form 2 is properly submitted.
    9. All topical wound ointments that do not contain a corticosteroid, local anesthetic or irritant (such as capsaicin) or other substances on the Prohibited List.
    10. Preventative or restorative joint therapies. Many of these products in the oral form (chondroitin, glucosamine, etc.) have always been allowed orally and in many cases this is the preferred route of administration. However in some circumstances a veterinarian may prefer to administer joint restorative therapy intravenously or intramuscularly. Specific examples of the medications used in this matter are Legend or Hyonate intravenously, Adequan intramuscularly or Pentosan polysulfate intramuscularly.
    11. Note - No intra-articular administration of any medications is allowed whilst under FEI rules.

    Q. What about the implications of the new List on Herbal, Homeopathic Products and foodstuffs?
    A. The FEI has always cautioned athletes, trainers, grooms and veterinarians against the use of herbal medications, tonics, oral pastes and products of any kind, the ingredients and quantitative analysis of which are not known in detail. Many of these products could actually contain one or more Prohibited Substances. A similar position is taken regarding foodstuffs.

    Persons administering a herbal or so called natural product to a horse or pony for health reasons or to affect its performance, having been informed that the plant origin of its ingredients do not violate the FEI regulations, may have been misinformed.

    The use of any herbal or natural product to affect the performance of a horse or pony in a calming (tranquilising) or an energising (stimulant) manner is expressly forbidden by FEI regulations. The use of a calming product during competition may also have important safety consequences.

    The FEI does not test or approve herbal or natural products to verify a possible violation of the FEI rules and regulations. Therefore a claim that the product does not violate the FEI rules or is undetectable by drug testing is the sole responsibility of the manufacturer or individual making such a claim. The use of a herbal or natural product may result in a positive test result, contrary to the claim by the manufacturer or marketing agent. Many Prohibited Substances have their origin in plants and may be regarded as serious rule violations. For example, many pharmacologically potent and readily detectable forbidden substances are obtained from plants, e.g. cocaine, heroin and marijuana all come from plants. This warning is common to all major equine regulatory authorities.

    Please also keep in mind the possible contamination of feed by Prohibited Substances. Athletes and their advisors should discuss this problem with their feed supplier. Avoid buying products in retail outlets for which specifications are unclear or from retailers you do not know very well. This warning also applies to feed additives.